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WHAT WE DO

We are an environmental consulting firm specializing in botanical surveys, vegetation monitoring, rare plant surveys, rare mammal and bird surveys, biological evaluations, wetland delineations, and technical writing.


 
 

WHERE?

Our work has taken us across the north-central United States, from Michigan to Montana. Most of the work has been for the US Forest Service, including National Forests (Ottawa, Nicolet, Chequamegon, Superior, Chippewa, Custer, and Lewis and Clark) and National Grasslands (Buffalo Gap, Grand River, Cedar River, Little Missouri, and Sheyenne). Other agencies we have worked with include the National Park Service (Badlands and Yellowstone), the U.S. Geological Survey, the Soil Conservation Service, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, and various cities and counties. Other projects have been for private firms such as The Nature Conservancy, realtors, developers, excavators, mining companies, and private landholders.


 
 

HOW?

The quality of our work has been recognized many times, having received merit awards from the US Forest Service in 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, and 2000. Buffalo Gap National Grasslands cited us for "outstanding contributions" to the rare species program, the Custer National Forest awarded us for "contributions to complete environmental assessments for livestock grazing." The Nicolet National Forest recognized us for "contribution to the inventory and management of rare plants on the forest" and for "organizational skills and dedicated botanical survey efforts." In more recent years, Yellowstone National Park observed that we had "raised the standard for all future reports," the Lewis and Clark National Forest continues to describe our work as 'outstanding."

We aim to be a low maintenance firm, with quick response, quick comprehension, thorough coverage, a fine report, and no wasted movement.


 
 

WHAT WE DID

2012 Field Season:  The fact is, the best place to keep up with our travels might be our blog. We had a 60% increase in work this year compared to 2011. About half of the work was in North Dakota, providing wildlife and botanical surveys for the Little Missouri National Grasslands, the US Fish and Wildlife Service and Corps of Engineers. Lots of surveys along prairie wetlands. Two months were spent in Montana working surveying rare plants for the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest and range inventory for the Lewis and Clark National Forest. Smoke everywhere. This was the third biggest year for wildland fires in the US on record. The month of March was spent in Ecuador in a valley between two volcanoes wondering if it is time to retire.

2011 Field Season:  Up to this point it was the busiest year yet, almost a carbon-copy of 2010, with continued rare plant survey activity with the Huron-Manistee and the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forests. This was the year to summarize the data gathered on the grazing monitoring on the Lewis and Clark National Forest from 2001 to 2010. There was a lot of activity up in North Dakota on the Baaken Formation, the oil shale deposit, doing biological evaluations on the Little Missouri National Grassland. Some work was done for the Fish and Wildlife Service and the Corps of Engineers for pipelines that were to crossing the Missouri River. These involved federally endangered and threatened species, some big names like Whooping crane, Interior least tern, Piping plover. I walked about 1000 miles again, plus about 800 miles on the bike. A lot of the riding was in the spring to build up strength after the knee surgery in February. The hard sided camper, a 17-foot Casita, was a lifesaver on the jobs in Montana, North Dakota and Michigan. What a change from working on the laptop in a tent hoping the battery doesn't quit before I save the document. It's an office on wheels. Finally, a desk job outside. We spent one month spent in Costa Rica doing volunteer work, but we took some time to explore the cloud forest and coastal dry forests.  

2010 Field Season:  Three new clients this year: The Huron-Manistee, the Gallatin and the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forests. All three were rare plant surveys, the Gallatin being in grizzly country. They loomed in the back of my mind all summer long...which is where they did all their damage. We did the annual grazing monitoring on the Lewis and Clark National Forest, as well as the biological evaluations on the Little Missouri National Grassland and the rare plant surveys on the Superior National Forest. We also worked on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation in North Dakota, doing biological evaluations. I walked about 1000 miles this summer, much of it over very steep terrain, especially on the Beaverhead. Tore a cartilage in the process. Surgery is in February. Got pounded by hail and lightning a couple of times in North Dakota. It felt like Dorothy in Kansas. It is time to get a hard sided camper. I still do not want a desk job. I've been to a town, Del. 

2009 Field Season:  We worked on five US Forest Service units. Projects: Target surveys for rare species on the Sheyenne National Grasslands, rare plant surveys Superior National Forest and Nicolet National Forest, comprehensive rare species surveys and biological evaluations on the Little Missouri National Grassland, and vegetation monitoring on the Lewis and Clark National Forest.  Plus a field day on the Chequamegon National Forest looking for some federally protected rare plants. Here are the rare species located this year: Taxus canadensis, Pyrola asarifolia, Senecio congestus, Galium labradoricum, Carex formosa, Equisetum palustre, Geocaulon lividum, Agoseris lackschewitzii, Ranunculus gmellini, Oxytropis campestris, Astragalus alpinus, Astragalus canadensis, Onoclea sensibilis, Gymnocarpium dryopteris, Apios americana, Galium labradoricum, Campanula aparinoides, Menyanthes trifoliata and Solidago flexicaulis. Of course, some of these are very common in other regions; we happened to be surveying for them on the edge or their range or in outlying populations.

2008 Field Season:  Worked on seven US Forest Service units. Projects: Target surveys for Talinum parviflorum on the Cedar River National Grasslands, target surveys for Platanthera praeclara on the Sheyenne National Grassland, rare plant surveys Superior National Forest, Chequamegon National Forest, and Nicolet National Forest, comprehensive rare species surveys and biological evaluations on the Little Missouri National Grassland (including aerial surveys for raptors), vegetation monitoring on the Lewis and Clark National Forest.  Rare species located this year: Taxus canadensis, Geocaulon lividum, and Carex michauxiana, and Agoseris lackschewitzii.

2007 Field Season: Worked on seven US Forest Service units. Target surveys for Chenopodium subglabrum on the Grand River National Grasslands, target surveys for Platanthera praeclara on the Sheyenne National Grassland, comprehensive rare plant surveys on the Little Missouri National Grassland, Superior National Forest and the Chequamegon National Forest, vegetation monitoring on the Lewis and Clark National Forest, aquatic plant surveys on Lac Vieux Desert on the Nicolet National Forest. Rare species located this year included Taxus canadensis, Geocaulon lividum, and Ranunculus lapponicus, and Agoseris lackschewitzii.

2006 Field Season: The rare Eriogonum visheri, or Dakota Buckwheat, on the Grand River National Grassland pushed the season into October this year. The plant turns a bright red in late summer and holds this color into the early winter. This is dinosaur country, and for the third year in a row the mighty Triceratops reared its bony head. We also worked in the oilfields in the badlands of North Dakota on the Little Missouri National Grassland and found Townsendia hookeri. Target surveys on the tallgrass prairie of the Sheyenne National Grassland for Platanthera praeclara. A few weeks were spent up by Washburn, WI, on the Chequamegon National Forest on a rare plant survey on proposed logging sites. No rare plants were seen there, although dozens of Platanthera orbiculata populations were encountered. This plant was de-listed a year or two ago. Surveys on the Superior National Forest in northern Minnesota recorded Platanthera hookeri and Taxus canadensis. Also, Dave attended a Wetland Delineation Training course in August put on by UW - LaCrosse. A trip to Poland during August reminded us where so many of the noxious weeds in North America originated. Look for more information on the Photos and Survey History pages.


 
 

WANT DETAILS?

 

Follow the menu bars. You can see just where we have been in Survey History. If you are wondering about qualifications or interests, go to About Us. If you want to get a better idea of the quality of our work go to Survey Reports. We have some photos of rare plants, habitats, and whatnot at Photos. If you want to follow us around on our journeys, look at the photo album at Travels.

It's all here. And if you wish, we can provide you with many references. And you can always give us a call or drop us a line and we will be glad to fill you in. Call Us Now!

 


 
 
Last updated: 12/14/2012
Email:
Phone: 715-356-7855
Mail: P. O. Box 1774, Woodruff, WI 54568
Web design and almost all graphics: David Schmoller (with thanks to Clif at the Design Department for demystification)

 
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